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There Are Cold Spots In My House

Is one room in your house colder than the rest? When it feels like winter in the kitchen but summer in the dining room, you may have cold spots in your house –– an HVAC issue worth investigating.

What's Causing The Cold Spots In My House?

Cold spots in your house are not only discomforting, but they may also indicate an issue with your home’s ductwork. Fortunately, there are ways to troubleshoot the hot and cold spots in your house before calling an HVAC specialist.

Potential Issues

  • pockets of cold air
  • high electricity bills
  • whistling noise from the ductwork

A duct system consists of rectangular ductwork and a series of tubes in the walls, floors, and ceilings that run through your home. Sealing and insulating ductwork prevents leaks and keeps the air warm or cool (depending on season) while it makes the journey to your vents. This means your HVAC system doesn't have to work overtime to keep up with the thermostat, which is better for the planet and your wallet. Since air follows the path of least resistance, it's also important to make sure no ducts are squeezed or damaged. Any of these situations can cause high energy bills and an uncomfortable home! A forced air HVAC system relies on a properly sized, sealed and insulated ductwork installation. The air in the ductwork must either heat or cool the home by delivering air with temperature ranges from 50 degrees to 130 degrees. In order for the system to be efficient, the air within the ductwork must be as close to the same temperature when it leaves the air handler or furnace, as it is when it blows into the conditioned space from the supply registers. Any temperature losses along the way result in less comfort, longer system run times and higher energy consumption.

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  • high electricity bills
  • pockets of cold air

Registers are the metal vent coverings that you can open or close to change the airflow in each room. You may want to close a register now and again to block a particularly drafty spot, but if too many registers are closed or partially closed, it can have some serious impacts on the airflow in your home. When the air distribution in your home is disrupted, some rooms will feel warmer or colder than other areas. The air can also back up into your ductwork, which increases pressure and can lead to duct leaks. This loss in efficiency can cause utility bills to spike. In the most extreme cases, blocked airflow will cause your furnace to overheat and possibly shut down. Always make sure to keep your registers unblocked, and if you do close one, make sure there are others open to still allow airflow into the room.

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  • high electricity bills
  • pockets of cold air

Your home's exterior shell and insulation is designed to keep out the cold during the winter and keep heat and humidity out during the summer. You may have gaps in areas where plumbing pipes and electric lines pass through the exterior walls and attic. Unconditioned air will find its way in through these small crevices. This can impact your comfort in the home and your energy bills.

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  • high electricity bills
  • whistling noise from the ductwork
  • pockets of cold air
  • indoor allergens

A well-designed AC system should provide a consistent temperature between rooms. Each room in your home has specific airflow needs that are calculated in CFM (cubic feet per minute). If your air ducts are leaking, each room is not getting the proper CFM of airflow. Cool air will escape through the leak, which means that your AC will need to run longer, raising energy bills to meet the demands of each room.

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  • pockets of cold air

Inside your home's heating and cooling system, there is a blower motor that spins the fans to circulate air and keep the temperature even throughout your home. If debris gets into the fan or the bearings wear down, the motor can break down. When the blower motor fails, that circulation stops and your cooling or heating system will not work properly. But, before either system shuts down, the first thing you'll likely notice is that your home won't reach the temperature set on your thermostat. To get your systems back in line, you'll need to repair or replace your blower motor.

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  • pockets of cold air
  • furnace is too noisy

Let's Get It Fixed!

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